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REVIEW
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 1  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 79-88

The advances in targeted therapy and immunotherapy for glioblastoma: Basic research and clinical trials


1 Department of Pathology, School of Basic Medical Sciences and The Affiliated Sir Run Run Hospital, Nanjing Medical University; Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, China
2 Department of Neurosurgery, The Affiliated Yijishan Hospital of Wannan Medical College, Wuhu, Hubei, China
3 Department of Oncology, The Affiliated Sir Run Run Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, China
4 Department of Pathology, School of Basic Medical Sciences and The Affiliated Sir Run Run Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, China
5 Department of Integrated Medicine, Guangdong Well Clinic and Union Doctor Group, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China
6 Department of Neurosurgery, First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin, China
7 Department of Pathology, School of Basic Medical Sciences and The Affiliated Sir Run Run Hospital, Nanjing Medical University; Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu; Department of Neurosurgery, The Affiliated Yijishan Hospital of Wannan Medical College, Wuhu, Hubei, China

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Hongping Xia
Department of Pathology, School of Basic Medical Sciences and The Affiliated Sir Run Run Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 21116, Jiangsu
China
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/glioma.glioma_10_18

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Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and fatal type of malignant central nervous system tumor with high invasion. The median overall survival of GBM is only around 14 months by standard treatment, which conventionally consists of surgical resection, followed by radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy with temozolomide (TMZ). Currently, TMZ, carmustine, lomustine, and bevacizumab are the therapeutic drugs for GBM approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Due to the progress of molecular genetics in tumor therapy, new targeted therapy drugs are continuously emerging for GBM. Meanwhile, immunotherapies, such as immune checkpoint inhibitors, tumor vaccines, and chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cell therapy, have also made great achievements in clinical trials. The combination of molecular targeted therapy and immunotherapy of GBM has become the focus of current research. It shows promise in GBM treatment and gives new hope to patients. This review focuses on recent advances in targeted therapy and immunotherapy and discusses their combined treatment of GBM.


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