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LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 185

Cranial computed tomography scan in brain tumors


Department of Neurology; Department of Medicine; Federal University of Santa Maria, Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil

Date of Submission28-Oct-2019
Date of Acceptance24-Nov-2019
Date of Web Publication23-Jan-2020

Correspondence Address:
Mr. Jamir Pitton Rissardo
Rua Roraima 1000, Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul
Brasil
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/glioma.glioma_21_19

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How to cite this article:
Rissardo JP, Caprara AL. Cranial computed tomography scan in brain tumors. Glioma 2019;2:185

How to cite this URL:
Rissardo JP, Caprara AL. Cranial computed tomography scan in brain tumors. Glioma [serial online] 2019 [cited 2022 Nov 27];2:185. Available from: http://www.jglioma.com/text.asp?2019/2/4/185/276696

Dear Editor,

We read the article entitled, “Patterns of computed tomographic findings in patients from Maiduguri, Nigeria, diagnosed with a brain tumor” in the esteemed “Glioma” with great interest. Ali et al.[1] published a retrospective study in which neuroimaging of brain tumors was evaluated with patient's age, sex, and clinical information. In this context, their study results are important for their region that may lead to early diagnosis, prompt management, and avoiding severe complications.

The assessment of the drawbacks of the manuscript is also an essential mean for learning. In this way, here, we would like to highlight some of the limitations of their article. First, the population studied was from one center, which could lead to selected data as well-known in epidemiological profile studies.[2] Second, the study was conducted without the analysis between adults and children. This is a fact that possibly can provide a mixture of data that are different since, for example, the majority of brain tumors in adults are supratentorial, whereas infratentorial tumors are common in children.[3] Moreover, this could also explain their finding of the meningeal tumor origin being the most frequent. Another interesting fact is about the lesion density that is sometimes dependent on the professional analysis of the image. One-way to prevent this type of concern is to include an objective analysis method like a Hounsfield scale.[4]



 
  References Top

1.
Ali AM, Buji MA, Abubakar A. Patterns of computed tomographic findings in patients from Maiduguri, Nigeria, diagnosed with a brain tumor. Glioma 2019;2:153-6.  Back to cited text no. 1
  [Full text]  
2.
Guyatt GH, Oxman AD, Vist G, Kunz R, Brozek J, Alonso-Coello P, et al. GRADE guidelines: 4. Rating the quality of evidence-study limitations (risk of bias). J Clin Epidemiol 2011;64:407-15.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Hodkinson P, Hodkinson H. The Strengths and Limitations of Case Study Research. Cambridge: Proceedings of the 5th Annual Conference of the Learning and Skills Research Network; 2001.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Shapurian T, Damoulis PD, Reiser GM, Griffin TJ, Rand WM. Quantitative evaluation of bone density using the Hounsfield index. Int J Oral Maxillofac Implants 2006;21:290-7.  Back to cited text no. 4
    




 

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